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Courses

Fall 2021 Courses

CST 200A (27410) - R. Jaleel History of Cultural Studies: Genealogies of Cultural Studies: Histories and traditions of cultural studies internationally; multiple legacies of cultural studies as a field of inquiry in various geographical contexts; foregrounds important critical perspectives resulting from social and intellectual movements worldwide. 

M: 3:10pm-6:00pm


CST 290 (27444) -  - Colloquium: CST Speaker Series. Designed to provide cohort identity and faculty-student exchange. Opportunity to present papers, hear guest lecturers, and see faculty presentations, gather for organizational and administrative news, exchange information, and make announcements. 

Thur: 4:10pm - 6:00pm


CST 298 (27455) - S. Zepeda - Cultural Studies – Special Topics: Race, Decolonization, and Methodologies

This course will focus on the interconnections of theories of race, practices of decolonization, and methodologies relevant to cultural studies research.  Critical to this course is the mapping of structures embedded by race, racialization, racism, and colonization. We will hold at the center how, although varying based on geopolitical location, race and colonization shape life experiences, and worldviews. There will be a focus on critical decolonial feminist methodologies as a site of knowledge that is linked to genealogies of intellectual inquiry rooted in dialogue, collaboration, collectivity, relationship building, storytelling, and ancestors. 

Wen: 1:10pm-4:00pm


 

AFFILIATE COURSES

 

 


HIS 202H (36849) - J. Leroy - Readings in African American History -

In this course we will focus on recently published work in the field of African American history, covering the 17th-20th centuries. Paying careful attention to questions of method and archive, we will focus on topics such as slavery and its afterlives, policing, racial capitalism, and black feminism.

R: 3:10-6:00pm


AAS 202 - M. AdejunmobiCritical Foundations in African studies


ENL 233-1 (53333) M. JerngLaw and Literature: Racial Differentiation, Social Life, and Speculative Knowledge

This seminar has two research areas that we will work to put into dialogue: 1) genealogies of critical race theory in legal studies; 2) speculative fiction. It will focus on intersections across law and literature that focus on the mutual imbrication of race and the regulation of social life. With the first, we will focus on the ways in which critical race theorists have analyzed the law and its production of norms of freedom, property, contract, personhood, corporations, and violence. We will think through the law as a regulatory apparatus that uses grammars and conventions such as the counterfactual, precedent in-place-of history, tort, causation, and testimony. With the second, we will focus on writers using practices of speculation across various genres (alternate history; non-fiction; graphic novels; fantasy; science fiction; poetry) that invite alternative ways of understanding, envisioning reality, and worldbuilding. In addition to reading within these two critical areas, we will focus on developing methods for thinking across legal and literary modes of thinking. We will have some explicit help in the form of legal theorists such as Derrick Bell, who writes speculative fiction. We will read legal cases such as Mashpee v. New Seabury Corp, Dred Scott, United States vs. Bhagat Vind Singh, Korematsu, Loving v. Virginia; oral argumentation and the sources on which legal argumentation rely; as well as legal writing by Derrick Bell, Patricia Williams, Cheryl Harris, Mari Matsuda, and Sora Han. We will read writers such as James Baldwin, Octavia Butler, Grace Dillon, W.E.B. Du Bois, Henry Dumas, Sesshu Foster, Harriet Jacobs, N.K. Jemisin, Ken Liu, Ann Petry, among others.

R: 3:10PM-6:00PM  120 Voorhies

Winter 2022 Courses

CST 200B (18609) - J. Sze - Theories of Cultural Studies

Definitions of "critical" scholarship and examination of various contexts in which cultural studies theory has emerged worldwide. Both mainstream and alternative theoretical traditions, such as those developed by people of color and by other minoritized groups.

Tue: 10:00am-1:00pm


CST 250 (44644) - C. Whithaus -  Research Seminar

This seminar focuses on the preparation and writing of a draft dissertation prospectus in the qualitative interdisciplinary field of cultural studies. A dissertation prospectus is a distinct genre that can vary somewhat in its characteristics depending on specific field(s). During the quarter you will write components of the prospectus and critique each other’s work. By the end of the quarter you will have a workable initial draft of a dissertation prospectus.

While our work will focus on developing a working draft for your dissertation prospectus, we will also attend to other important writing opportunities such as academic journal articles, grant proposals, and public-facing, activist-oriented scholarship. This seminar should provide you space to think about how all these writing activities might fit within the developing trajectory of your research, scholarship, and public engagement.

Thur: 10:00am-1:00pm 


CST 298 (18635) - S. de la Mora -  

Wen: 2:10pm-5:00pm 


CST 290 (18633) -  - Colloquium: CST Speaker Series.  

Designed to provide cohort identity and faculty student exchange. Opportunity to present papers, hear guest lecturers, and see faculty presentations, gather for organizational and administrative news, exchange information, and make announcements.

Thur 4:10-6:00 PM 


AFFILIATE COURSES

 

AAS 204 - B. Ng'wenoAAS 204 Methodologies in African American and African Studies


GSW 200A Current Issues in Feminist Theory. W. Ho (ASA/GSW/CST).

This seminar examines current issues in feminist theory, techniques employed to build feminist theory in various fields.  

Tuesdays, 2:10—5 pm

 

Spring 2022 Courses

CST 200C (37527) - E. Kohl - Practices of Cultural Studies

Methodological and practical applications of cultural studies research. Critical analyses of ethnography, textual analysis, social change, community development, and identity formation. Emphasis given to students' unique versions of cultural studies practices. 

W: 1:00pm-3:00pm


CST 290 (37544) -  - Colloquium: CST Speaker Series.  

Designed to provide cohort identity and faculty-student exchange. Opportunity to present papers, hear guest lecturers, and see faculty presentations, gather for organizational and administrative news, exchange information, and make announcements.

Thur 4:10-6:00 PM 


AFFILIATE COURSES

 

TBA 

 

Courses

The course listings on this page are also listed in the UC Davis General CatalogNot all courses are available every year. Quarterly course selection is determined by evaluating student need/interests and availability of affiliate faculty. Current academic year CST selections are available directly below. Or you can view the full course catalog.

To determine which courses you should take and when, please refer to our CST Checklist.

CST Full Course List

200A. Histories of Cultural Studies (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Undergraduate coursework in the humanities or social sciences recommended. Histories and traditions of cultural studies internationally; multiple legacies of cultural studies as a field of inquiry in various geographical contexts; foregrounds important critical perspectives resulting from social and intellectual movements worldwide.—F. (F.) 

200B. Theories of Cultural Studies (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 200A or consent of instructor. Definitions of "critical" scholarship and examination of various contexts in which cultural studies theory has emerged worldwide. Both mainstream and alternative theoretical traditions, such as those developed by people of color and by other minoritized groups.—W. (W.) 

200C. Practices of Cultural Studies (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: courses 200A and 200B or consent of instructor. Methodological and practical applications of cultural studies research. Critical analyses of ethnography, textual analysis, social change, community development, and identity formation. Emphasis given to students' unique versions of cultural studies practices.—S. (S.)

204. History and Theory of Sexualities (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 200A (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor. Studies of sexuality in feminist, literary, historical, and cultural studies research, specifically examining the emergence of "sexuality" as a field of research and the relationship of sexuality studies to cultural forms, subjectivity, and social relations generally. May be repeated two times for credit. Offered irregularly.—F. (F.) 

206. Studies in Race Theory (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 200A (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor. Theoretical framework for the critical study of race, drawing on contemporary cultural studies and postcolonial scholarship in order to understand the social production of "race" as a category for organizing social groups and determining group processes. Offered irregularly.—W. (W.) 

208. Studies in Nationalism, Transnationalism, and Late Capitalism (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 200A (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor. Contemporary theories of nation, nationalism, postcolonialism, and transnationalism. Specific attention to the relationship between cultural production and the formation of ideas about nation and nationalism, including examination of both "legitimizing" and resistant discourses. Offered irregularly.—S. (S.) 

210. Memory, Culture, and Human Rights (4)

Seminar—3 hours; term paper. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Restricted to graduate students. Explores the multiple convergences among memory, culture, and human rights. Discusses diverse approaches to how societal actors in different historical, cultural, and national settings, construct meanings of past political violence, inter-group conflicts, and human rights struggles. (Same course as Human Rights 200B.) Offered in alternate years.—F. Lazzara

212. Studies in the Rhetorics of Culture (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 200A (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor. Survey of critical and analytical approaches to the study of texts. Examination of multi-mediated objects to understand their cultural import by focusing on discursive production, dispersal, and reception processes, and related shifts in power relations. Offered irregularly.—F. (F.) 

214. Studies in Political and Cultural Representations (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course 200A (may be taken concurrently) and consent of graduate adviser. Framework for the analysis of political and popular cultural representations. Emphasis on concepts, theories, and methodologies illuminating dominant and vernacular cultural representation, appropriation, and innovation in transnational contexts. May be repeated for credit up to 4 times when topic differs. Offered irregularly.—W. (W.)

250. Research Seminar (4)

Seminar—4 hours. Prerequisite: courses 200A, 200B, 200C or consent of instructor. Designed to facilitate student interaction and promote student research by guiding students through the production of a publishable essay. Essays submitted, distributed, and discussed by seminar participants. May be repeated up to 12 units of credit.—W. (W.)

270A. Individually Guided Research in Cultural Studies (4)

Discussion—1 hour; independent study—2 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 200C, 250, consent of instructor. Individually guided research, under the supervision of a faculty member, on a Cultural Studies topic related to the student's proposed dissertation project to produce a dissertation prospectus.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

270B. Individually Guided Research in Cultural Studies (4)

Discussion—1 hour; independent study—2 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 200C, 250, consent of instructor. Individually guided research, under the supervision of a faculty member, on a Cultural Studies topic related to the student's proposed dissertation project to produce a dissertation prospectus.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

270C. Individually Guided Research in Cultural Studies (4)

Discussion—1 hour; independent study—2 hours; extensive writing. Prerequisite: course 200C, 250, consent of instructor. Individually guided research, under the supervision of a faculty member, on a Cultural Studies topic related to the student's proposed dissertation project to produce a dissertation prospectus.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.) 

290. Colloquium (1)

Lecture—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Designed to provide cohort identity and faculty student exchange. Opportunity to present papers, hear guest lecturers, and see faculty presentations, gather for organizational and administrative news, exchange information, and make announcements. May be repeated up to 12 units of credit. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

295. Special Topics (4)

Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Special topics courses offered according to faculty and student interests and demands. May be repeated for credit with consent of adviser.—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

298. Group Research (1-5)

(S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

299. Directed Research (1-5)

(S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

299D. Dissertation Research (1-12)

Independent study—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: advancement to doctoral candidacy. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)

Professional

396. Teaching Assistant Training Practicum (1-4)

Prerequisite: graduate standing. May be repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—F, W, S. (F, W, S.)